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KPIX (CBS) 5
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Search Results 0 to 8 of about 9 (some duplicates have been removed)
CBS
Dec 31, 2012 6:30pm EST
a few hours, the u.s. will go over the fiscal cliff which could trigger across-the-board tax increases and billions in spending cuts. however, there is hope for a soft landing. senate republican leader mitch mcconnell and president obama said today a deal was close. but late in the day house leaders announced they will not vote on a deal tonight. they're waiting for the senate. so what happens now? we have two reports beginning with nancy cordes on capitol hill. nancy, good evening. >> good evening to you, rebecca. it looks like the deadline pressure finally prompted a meeting of the minds today. negotiators agreed to a plan that extends the bush era tax cuts for 99% of americans. but they are hung up on one key spending issue, and so it looks like we will go over the fiscal cliff at least temporarily. >> we're very, very close to an agreement. >> reporter: senate republican leader mitch mcconnell said his round-the-clock negotiations with vice president biden had paid off. >> i can report that we've reached an agreement on all of the tax -- the tax -- issues. >> reporter: first and foremost, the bush era tax cuts. the two
CBS
Dec 28, 2012 6:30pm EST
said he is mottestly optimistic about a deal to avoid the fiscal cliff, which would mean avoiding automatic tax increases and spending cuts come, you know, 1. the president spoke to the nation this evening after an hour-long meeting with congressional leaders at the white house. democrat and republican leaders have agreed to extend jobless benefits and some tax increases. they appear to remain deadlocked on who exactly will pay those higher taxs. we have two reports tonight, beginning with major garrett at the white house. major, good evening. >> reporter: good evening, jeff. two things are clear tonight that were not clear this morning-- progress is real and if a deal is reached, it will be far smaller than any of the key players envisioned only a couple weeks ago. is this deal, if it's to be reached, will not the so-called grand bargain with trillions of dollars of deficit reduction. in fact, jeff, it's not even clear this deal-- again, if there is one-- would stop the across-the-board spending cuts for the defense department and other government programs. it looks like those cuts will go forward. what the president said tod
CBS
Dec 31, 2012 7:00pm EST
president, senate republican leader mitch mcconnell said an agreement on the fiscal cliff was very, very close. >> we'll continue to work on finding smarter ways to cut spending, but let's not let that hold up protecting americans from the tax hike that will take place in about 10 hours. >> reporter: the deal would raise the top tax rate for individuals making more than $400,000 and couples with more than $450,000 in income. itemized deductions would be limited for individuals making more than $250,000 and couples making more than $300,000. the estate tax would rise to 40%. emergency unemployment benefits would be extended for another year. the alternative minimum tax would be adjusted for inflation permanently. and, in an effort to boost the economy, small businesses would be eligible for another year of bonus depreciation when they buy equipment. the big hang up is what to do about the sequester-- $110 billion in automatic spending cuts in defense and domestic programs that begin at midnight. democrats want to postpone the cuts for a year or more. republicans for just a few months. >> i think there are some republicans who believe there is no other trigger
CBS
Dec 26, 2012 5:30pm PST
uncertainty about the so-called fiscal cliff, tax hikes and spending cuts set to take effect next year. if lawmakers don't reach a deal to avoid it, consumers could see higher taxes eating into their paychecks. even online sales suffered. compared to past years of double-digit growth, this year, online holiday sales rose only about 8%, compared to nearly 16% last year. overall, holiday spending accounts for up to 30% of retailers' annual sales, so the disappointing season is a concern for an economy struggling to recover. >> consumers need to have more confidence. consumers need to feel that their jobs are secure. it's not an ideal situation. it's more of a conservative, cautious time. and companies are managing carefully, consumers are spending carefully. >> reporter: retailers are now hoping to lure consumers with deep discounts of 75% to 80% off in some cases as they try to salvage profits from this lackluster holiday shopping season. jim. >> axelrod: so, elaine, this is the first set of holiday shopping numbers that we've seen. any chance that they'll be revised as we get more data
CBS
Dec 27, 2012 5:30pm PST
fiscal cliff deadline when income tax cuts and payroll tax cuts are set to expire, $110 billion worth of spending cuts kick in, and two million jobless americans lose their unemployment benefits. for the first time, leader reid said today that it looks like the nation is going to go over the fiscal cliff, but that may just have been bluster, jeff, to try to put more pressure on republicans. >> glor: so, nancy, the house coming back on sunday. is that a good sign? >> reporter: well, it is in the sense that if the senate does manage to pass something, the house would be here to vote on it, as well. originally, speaker boehner had told his members that he would give them 48 hours' notice if they were needed back here at the capitol, but there was a recognition, i think, that it just looked bad for the house to be gone when we were so close to the fiscal cliff deadline. >> glor: nancy cordes, thank you. major garrett has been following developments at the white house. major, what is the president's next move? >> reporter: it is not a breakthrough but it is a glimmer of hope. officials tel
CBS
Dec 24, 2012 5:30pm PST
already fallen off the fiscal cliff. her budget-- which relies on of federal grants-- is being cut by - % now as the n.i.h.-- the national institutes of health-- prepares for the possibility of utes of hes later. >> it's much bigger than just my lab. it's affecting all academic labs across this country. >> reporter: mowen, who studies rheumatoid arthritis at the scripps research institute in california, understands the n.i.h. decision but calls it a t aback. >> my lab will have to shut down t dearch projects that we know could have profound impacts on curing human disease. we may have to get rid of some staff members. >> reporter: the n.i.h. tells us >> secause of uncertainty in the budget awards at 90% of what was promised to researchers will be lhe standard at least for now. and the threat of a $2.5 billion cut has raised alarms. at johns hopkins university, dr. stephan desiderio is under pressure to reduce the experiments he designs in mice in his search for a cure for culdhood leukemia. does that make a more uncertain morence? >> not only a more uncertain scie science, we actually
CBS
Dec 28, 2012 7:00pm EST
lifted. >> one area you would like theinvestors to avoid is municipal. that is a fiscal cliff area. >> closed american bond fundsare over value yelded and they are leveraged and we think the dividends are going to be cut and there is a risk we would just avoid them. >> do you own any of theserecommendations? >> for our discretionaryaccounts we own all of the closed end accounts and the herzfeld caribbean accounts olds all of the those we spoke of. >> susie: thank you very much tom. or our market monitor tomorrow herzfeld. coming up on monday on "n.b.r." we'll be monitoring those fiscal cliff negotiations, and we'll have news and analysis. we'll also a look back at the year in stocks, and s&p's sam stovall joins us to pre-view what's next for the markets in the year ahead. it could be one of the biggest trends in business next year: companies setting aside time for their employees to play. ruben ramirez explains. >> reporter: it may be hard to remember those hot summer days on the playground. the freedom to let your mind wander. how times have changed. as companies slashed jobs during the great recession worker productivity surged, today, many people are doing the job multiple people once did. >> i think o
Search Results 0 to 8 of about 9 (some duplicates have been removed)